Posts By Alex Fruzenshtein

akka http case class validation directive

If you work with Akka HTTP for a while, you should definitely know that it has multiple ways for model validation. I talk about http request body validation. Probably in 99% of cases you would like to ensure that user send something meaningful to the server. So exactly for this purpose Akka HTTP provides validation mechanisms. But what if you want to send back to the client side information about all invalid fields?

How to calculate median in Scala

Have you ever heard about a median? I'm talking about that thing from mathematician statistics, which represents a "middle" value of a data set. If you are reading this, I bet you hear about it. Moreover you want to know how to implement a median function in Scala. So I'll show you how it can be done.

Spark Course Stackoverflow week 2 3

So as you already know, I've enrolled to Functional Programming in Scala Specialization on Coursera. Currently I'm passing through the 4th course of the series "Big Data Analysis with Scala and Spark". If to be more precise, two days ago I completed an assignment for weeks #2 and #3. As usually I'm going to share my experience.

Coursera Spark week 1 Wikipedia

So this week is an official start of 4th course from Scala Specialization on Coursera. I mean Spark course. This is an outstanding event, because so many students have been waited for this almost 1 year :) What does it mean for me? Firstly I need to keep focused on video lectures and assignments. Secondly, I decided to share my impressions about the course here.

In this article I want to show a real difference between curried functions and partially applied functions in Scala. This question is pretty common for those developers who started learning Scala without previous experience in functional programming. Moreover, this blog post may be useful, even for experienced Scala developers, because based on my experience I have had incorrect understanding of the difference between the curried functions and partially applied functions.

The New Year and Christmas it's a good time for Java developers to wear a warm sweater with deers. And of course it's an excellent moment to summarize the previous year and make some plans and forecasts for the next 2017. Personally for me, it's almost tradition, I'm going to continue it and write a couple of thoughts about 2017 for Java developers.

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