Category Archives Scala

When I work with Scala collections, I always keep in mind that there are two types of operations which I can perform: transformation operations and actions or like someone call it aggregation operations. The first type transforms a collection into some another collection. The second one type returns some value.

I want to share with you a small piece of my project. It's about Scala programming language. If to be more precise it's about the most simple way of Scala studying. Why I said the most simple? Well, because I have a solid knowledge of mainstream problems which occur during Scala studying. So I invite you to discuss my job.

Probably the most painful thing for software developers is to be restricted in technology choice which they want to use in a development. You pay for a conference ticket, listen about new cool frameworks, development approaches or tools... Then you return to office with huge enthusiasm and desire to try at least something on real project. Unfortunately such initiative very frequently meets resistance from different sides: team members don't want to learn something new, a manager thinks it is risky, a product owner hurries with a next release, etc.

How often do you need to write or read files? This is pretty common task in any more or less not trivial project. Image upload process, CSV or XML parsing, XLS report generation etc. All these operations imply input or output processing. So I'm going to make an overview of the most powerful library for work with files in Scala.

JVM is too small for two leaders. That’s how I want to start a post about Java vs Scala. By the way, I had used Java for a long time, but then switched to Scala and wasn’t happy with that decision. Luckily I have understood how to use its features in order to be more productive developer. Make yourself comfortable, it's going to be a very interesting conversation about marketing in a programming languages world. Yes-yes, exactly conversation, because I encourage my readers to write comments with their thoughts about the topic.

Hello, dear Reader! I apologize for a such loud title of the article, but you should know how it's important for me to engage the readers to discussion. Not so long time ago, I decided to systemize my knowledge of object oriented programming in Scala. That was awesome idea! And now I want to share with you all mini-topics which I underlined as important, but many developers forget about them.

Today I want to write about a dream of every Java developer - pattern matching. While a switch statement works only with limited number of types, including primitive values, strings and enums, the pattern matching feels confident with almost any argument type. I'm going to demonstrate a batch of examples where pattern matching is useful.

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